Archive for October, 2012

FALL/WINTER PRODUCE

HERE IS AN UPDATE ON THE FALL/WINTER PROGRAM:

WE HAVE ROOM FOR 15 MORE PARTICIPANTS.

SIGN UP BY RESPONDING TO THIS EMAIL SAYING ‘COUNT ME IN’!

ORDER BEFORE MIDNIGHT ON SUNDAY (EMAIL tcraft@rtconnect.net OR CALL 431-1219),
(You don’t need to order each week–just when you need more spuds, and stuff)

PICKUP EACH WEDNESDAY BETWEEN 3:30 p.m. & 6:00 p.m.
Pickup is ‘self serve’…your produce will be in the cooler in a box with your name on it. Leave your check (or money in an envelope with your name on it) in the money box to the right of the inside of the door.

HERE IS WHAT WE HAVE AVAILABLE…as long as supplies last:
RED POTATOES–RUSSET POTATOES–YUKON POTATOES
5#- $2.50
10#- $5.00
20#- $9.00
CARROTS 2#- $2.00
ONIONS 2 for $1.50
ACORN SQUASH $1 each, 5 for $4
HUBBARD SQUASH $3 each, $2 for the smaller hubbards
#2 PUMPKINS $1 each, 3 for $1 on small pie pumpkins
TOMATOES 5 for $3.00
BREEN LETTUCE–remnants with good centers (mix with other lettuces for fullness) FREE
COASTAL STAR & NEVADA FULL SIZE HEAD LETTUCE–coming soon (growing in the hoophouse)

FALL INFO ON LLOYD CRAFT FARMS

GOOD NEWS! LLOYD CRAFT FARM’S PUMPKINS ARE IN WORLAND IGA.
We delivered 851# Friday and will deliver another 853# Monday.

We have these items available NOW for sale (call 431-1219 before you come):
Acorn Squash- 2/$1
Hubbard Squash- $1 small/ $3 large
Butternuts- 2/$1 (some scarring)
Lettuce- $1 bag

Tomatoes- 10#/$17.50
5#/$10
(Call 431-1219 by Tuesday, Oct. 16 for pick up Thursday, October 18th)

HERE IS THE PLAN FOR THE FALL/WINTER EXTENSION: We have potatoes, carrots, and onions. I am working on potato storage (waiting for delivery of a heating/cooling unit) and this week we will dig the remainder of potatoes and carrots, inventory, and then store them for short term storage. Hoophouse contains tomatoes (which need to be picked again) and lettuce and cucumbers are growing. (Weather has been great for the hoophouses!) Price and Pick up details will be posted October 24th.

Fresh produce, locally grown! The Farmer’s Wife

HARVEST SEASON 2012 IS FINISHED

Well…it is official! 2012 season SHARE season is over. Before another moment passes thank you for being a part of the FIRST year of our New ADVENTURE. Your excitement and enthusiasm fueled us and kept us going! We hope that the garden fueled YOU! I know you got the best food value for your money…it was the REAL thing…fresh-picked wholesome veggies from nutrient-rich soil–raised naturally with no harsh chemicals or synthetic fertilizers. I hope the produce was not a burden and that you were able to eat more veggies than in the past and use freezing and simple canning techniques to extend the value of the fresh nutrients.

We will spend this winter accessing our operation–failures and successes–and making plans for 2013: new memberships, Share adjustments and changes, cost of adding a Fruit Share, defining the Canner’s Share, and streamlining our operation to make it financially viable…we want to be here for the long term! 🙂

For us the job of the garden is not quite done–we still have pumpkins and squash to sell, lots of clean up in prep for the spring, and on-going education on the hoophouse (Heating 101 & Economics 201). But for NOW–a much needed week of rest and reshuffling the clutter in my house. The Farmer has sugar beets to dig and deliver, and then some healing time for his shoulders and back. (And dig as we did–we STILL have potatoes and carrots in the ground!–More on that later…next week.)

God Bless you all…And Thank you Lord for the abundance of the earth and this wonderful creation–Amen

WINTER SQUASH

In tomorrow’s final share you will get your winter squash–Acorn, Butternut, Hubbard, and Pumpkin Pie pumpkins. HERE’S A LITTLE INFORMATION:

Winter squash is a warm-season vegetable that can be grown in most of the country. It differs from summer
squash in that it is harvested and eaten in the mature fruit stage, when the seeds within have matured fully and the skin has hardened into a tough rind. When ripened to this stage, fruits of most varieties can be stored for use throughout the winter.

Most winter squash benefits from a curing stage; the exceptions are acorn. Curing is simply holding the squash at room temperature (about 70 degrees) for 10 to 20 days.

After curing, transfer to a cool (45 to 50 degrees), dry place such as the basement or garage for long term storage. Careful, do not allow them to freeze. The large hard rind winter squash can be stored up to six months under these conditions. Warmer temperatures simply mean shorter storage time.

The smaller acorn and butternut do not store as well, only up to 3 months. Store cut pieces of winter squash in the refrigerator. Refrigeration is too humid for whole squash, and they will deteriorate quickly.

Nutritional Value & Health Benefits
Winter squash is a tasty source of complex carbohydrate (natural sugar and starch) and fiber. Fiber, which was once called roughage, absorbs water and becomes bulky in the stomach. It works throughout the intestinal track, cleaning and moving waste quickly out of the body. Research suggests that this soluble fiber plays an important role in reducing the incidence of colon cancer.

Winter squash is also a source of potassium, niacin, iron and beta carotene. The orange-fleshed squash is also an excellent source of beta carotene. As a general rule, the deeper the orange color, the higher the beta carotene content. Beta carotene is converted to Vitamin A in the body. Vitamin A being essential for healthy skin, vision, bone development and maintenance as well as many other functions.

Preparation & Serving
Peeling winter squash can be a challenge to the novice. The thin-skinned varieties (acorn, butternut) can be peeled with a paring knife or vegetable peeler.

Most recipes using these varieties call for cutting the squash in half. Position the squash on a cutting board, stem end facing you. Place the blade of a heavy chef’s knife horizontally along the length of the squash. With a hammer or mallet, repeatedly hit the back of the blade near the handle to drive it into the squash until it breaks in half.

Place the larger varieties (Hubbard) on newspaper and use a sharp cleaver to split the hard-rind open. Or use the chef’s knife method described above. Once you have a slit cut, bang on a hard surface and pull apart. Pieces are easier to peel. With a spoon, scoop out the seeds and strings and discard, or set
aside if you plan to roast the seeds.

To cook winter squash, place unpeeled pieces cut sides down on a shallow baking dish and bake in a 350°F oven for 30 minutes or longer. Check for doneness by piercing with a fork or skewer. When tender, remove from the oven and allow the pieces to cool. Spoon out the soft flesh and mash with a fork or process in a blender or food processor. Peeled pieces can be cut into cubes and boiled until tender. Use
with any recipe calling for cooked, mashed, or pureed squash. Or microwave the squash pieces on high for 15 minutes or longer.

Small acorn squash and spaghetti squash can be pierced in several places with a long-tined fork or metal skewer and baked whole. Piercing prevents the shell from bursting during cooking. Place the squash on a baking dish and bake for 1 1/2 to 2 hours at 325°F. Test for doneness by squeezing the shell. When it gives a bit with pressure, it is done.

Home Preservation
Store whole winter squash in an area where temperatures range from 45 to 50°F for three to six months. At room temperature reduce storage time to one and a half to three months depending on variety. See the selection and storage information above.

Cooked squash freezes well. Pack into freezer containers or freezer bags leaving 1/2
inch head space and freeze for up to one year. Canning is not recommended unless
the squash is cut into cubes.

Mashed squash is too dense and heat penetration is uneven. Because spaghetti squash does not stay cubed on heating, it should be frozen instead of canned. For all other varieties, follow the procedure and processing times outlined in canning pumpkin.

Recipes
Herbs and spices used to enhance the flavor of winter squash include garlic, nutmeg,
ginger, cinnamon, basil, parsley and a pinch of ground cloves. Sweeten squash pulp
with maple syrup, honey, brown sugar, or orange juice concentrate.

Visit http://www.lloydcraftfarms.com, RECIPES tab for 2 Squash Bread recipes

IMPORTANT–FINAL PICK-UP THIS WEEK

TUESDAY WILL BE THE ONLY DAY FOR PICK-UP–NO FRIDAY PICK-UP
TIME CHANGE–3 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.–call 431-1219 if you will be later.
BRING EXTRA BAGS–potatoes and broccoli will not be individually bagged
MANY LARGE ITEMS–

Well, we are ready to wrap up and take a break–What a GREAT first year!

It is colder and harder to harvest and clean veggies–for that I apologize.

The Farmer is heavy into Beet Harvest and The Farmer’s Wife is dragging butt.

The FINAL SHARE should include:
NEW ENGLAND PUMPKINS-small pie pumpkins (extras for last Tuesday’s group)
BROCCOLIcan you believe it!
POTATOES-5 POUNDS
RED ROMAINE LETTUCE
SPINACH CROWNS
TOMATOES
CARROTS
BUNCHED GREEN ONION TOPS– Chive-like
WINTER SQUASHES-Acorn, Butternut, Hubbard
GARLIC BULB

FOR SALE: JACK-O-LANTERN PUMPKINS –ALL SIZES AND SHAPES–
………………………$3 small, $5 medium, $7 large

SEE EVERYONE TUESDAY–3 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

FRIDAY PICK UP–IMPORTANT

TODAY’S PROJECTED HIGH IS 45 DEGREES WITH A CHANCE OF SNOWin fact it is SNOW misting right now!

PICK UP TIME FOR TODAY IS 3:00 – 5:30 p.m. (call 431-1219 if later time needed)
Park in the regular place, but instead of picking up from the cooler van, head to the small HEATED hoophouse behind the van–

As on Tuesday, I still have onions, tomatoes (call ahead), and bell peppers for sale for making Spaghetti Sauce- 6 onions, 6 bell peppers, 10# tomatoes makes 6 qts. SPAGHETTI SAUCE for $19

ALSO, PUMPKINS–Your SHARE includes small pumpkin pie pumpkins.
We have over 200 jack-o-lantern type for sale–$3 small, $5 medium, $7 big

IMPORTANT– 4 ITEMS

1) BUTTONING DOWN THE HATCH—impending first frost has us scrambling today as we finish covering the hoophouse, bring in ALL the squash, make the final pick on the tomatoes and hot peppers, AND prepare your Share! REMINDER: PICK-UP TIME 4-7 p.m.

2) EXTRAS FOR SALE AT PICK-UP:
PUMPKINS- 40 cents/#
BELLS- 2/$1
ONIONS- $1
TOMATOES- $1/#

I made the Spaghetti Sauce—10# tomatoes, 6 bells & 6 onions above for $19—AND it was THE BEST AND EASIEST canned sauce EVER!—Made 6 quarts and we’ve eaten 2 already.

3) THIS WEEK’S SHARE—First Week in October
BIG CHUNKY BELLS
ACORN SQUASH
POTATOES, CARROTS, ONIONS
LETTUCE & TOMATOES
NEW ENGLAND PUMPKINS—for pie!

4) THE PLUM MAN has 15 final gallons of American Plums– $2/gallon covers the cost of picking, delivery, and refrigeration. He reports that 6 gallons are larger. Place order by Thursday for delivery on Friday the 5th. Makes the best jellies and wine!
Ripe BUFFALO BERRIES coming soon!