Archive for June, 2012

First Harvest & Season Delivery Schedule

We had our FIRST HARVEST this morning–and our FIRST DELIVERY!

Thank you to everyone that came to the Open House–it was wonderful to get to meet so many people that I have been talking to (through emails and phone) for the past couple of months. We are thrilled you are on this adventure with us!

Today we prepared shares for all 57 members (77 units) using what was available from the gardens. We were a little short on some items (squash and broccoli) and a little long on others (Swiss Chard and bok choi)–this is the first step, the starting point, and from here it is going to get better!

Here is the schedule for the remainder of the season–
Tuesday from 4-7PM–All out-of-towners and Worland members A-L
Friday from 4-7PM–Worland members M-W

See you Tuesday, July 3rd, and Friday, July 6th.

Remember: if you can’t make it, have someone else come and pick up your share. We have no place to hold them–even overnight. 🙁

And also–we will have Swiss Chard again and can try a better way to preserve it for delivery. We have never stored or delivered Swiss Chard outside of personal use. I was shocked at how it wilted down!

First Share

Possible Share Contents for Tuesday, June 26th:

Summer Squash: Safari & Spineless Perfection Zucchini, Slick Pick Yellow

Lettuce: Mini-head Romaine Varieties– Breen (Red) & Claremont (green)

Rainbow Swiss Chard

Bok Choi

Broccoli: Blue Wind–looser bud with a stronger broccoli taste (early variety)

WE ARE NOT SURE OF THE IMPACT OF THE HEAT WAVE. HEAT CAN MAKE LETTUCE BITTER AND BROCCOLI BOLT. WE ARE TRYING TO HOLD THE BROCCOLI BUT WOULD SUGGEST THAT IT BE EATEN SHORTLY AFTER PICKED UP FOR THE BEST FLAVOR. (THE OTHER BROCCOLI VARIETIES WE HAVE ARE BETTER SUITED FOR HEAT.)

WE TRIED THE LETTUCE TODAY AND IT WAS OKAY–BEST WASHED IMMEDIATELY AND STORED IN THE FRIDGE IN A ZIP-LOCK BAG. VARIETY IS CRISP WITH A GOOD TEXTURE. IF THE FLAVOR HAS BEEN COMPROMISED, STILL EXCELLENT MIXED WITH OTHER GREENS.

–ALL ITEMS WILL BE HARVESTED TUESDAY MORNING AND PUT INTO THE COOLER FOR PICK UP AT THE OPEN HOUSE–

See RECIPE page for information on your goods! (Produce is listed alphabetically)

BTW

OH! BTW–I added a new page to the blog called FARM TALES. The first story is of our Great Horned Owl family and Hanging Upside Down–check it out!

OPEN HOUSE

OPEN HOUSE–
When?
Tuesday, June 26th, 2012
6 – 9 PM

Where?
Lloyd Craft Farms CSA,
1049 Washakie Ten, Worland, WY 82401

Time is approaching! Tour the gardens, and pick up your first share!
Bring a bag to transfer your share from the fridge box carton to take home!
Any June payments due can be paid then–

Directions: TO AVOID ROAD CONSTRUCTION take Lane 7 to Washakie 10
Travel N on 10th Street out of town to Lane 7, Right onto Lane 7, Traveling East to Washakie 10 (County Road 10), Right onto Washakie 10, Traveling South on Washakie Ten to 1049 Washakie Ten, turn left into our ‘driveway’. Landmarks are 5 HUGE stainless steel granaries. Look for LLOYD CRAFT FARMS CSA SIGN.

SEE YOU THEN!

The Phenomenon of Weeds and Wisdom

As it is late and I am rummy–not cards or liquor–I will try not to wander too much in my rambling.  But, tonight, as I was finishing up paying the bills and posting payments and sending email receipts, I flashed back on this past week.  It was all about WEEDS–seriously…  Yesterday was the climax–I found myself crawling on my hands and knees for 180 feet on black plastic with neat rows of corn to my right and left.  Tightly packed around the base of each stalk, or in the empty holes with no stalks, were the healthy unwanted plants…weeds to us-purslane, lamb’s quarter, and night shade to name the greatest offenders.  Three rows away was The Farmer–he was planting MORE corn…5 beds more to be exact.  The beauty of his corn was NO WEEDS–yet…

Earlier this week, The Daughter who did not wish to weed the carrots, chose to weed the corn.  She covered one bed (just as I did yesterday) on her hands and knees (just as I did yesterday) in an hour (unlike my 2 hours).  That day it was 91 degrees outside, unlike my cool evening with light wind.

When I first told The Daughter we had to weed the corn, she looked at me in surprise.  “We don’t have to weed the corn.  The corn is taller than the weeds and the weeds won’t bother it.”  I explained that the weeds would rob the corn of nutrients–they were fighting for the nutrients right now. The corn is taller than the weeds, but the weeds will continue to grow and though they won’t choke out the corn, they will prevent the corn from being the best it can be.  She wimpered a little more and said, “I still don’t think that it is a problem…who told you we needed to weed the corn?”

“The Farmer told me,” and she got right to it.  🙂  Go FARMER!!

Well, enough for now…late…oh yeah:  OPEN HOUSE the last week in June.  If we have enough variety for your first Share, you can pick it up at the Open House.  If not, you can see the garden where YOUR produce is being raised, meet The Farmer and his humble Wife, and pick up the first Share after the 4th of July.  I’ll send more information next week.  BTW–June payments can be mailed or brought with you to the Open House.

Till then– Be Healthy, Eat Fresh–hugs and kisses, Tired Marm 🙂

UPDATE–

Just a quick note to let you all know that we are laboring in the garden.

We had a scare the 25th of May:  two days after transplanting all the plants the weather forecast was 32 degrees!  Terrible conditions for new tender plants not yet acclimated, and some (tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant) that actually love it hot and humid.  We rangled some Agri-Bon and were able to get them all covered ‘just in case’– or was it ‘just in time’?  The night never did reach the freezing point, though it lingered at 36 degrees for three nights running, and the days were cold and overcast and windy.  We left the row cover on for over a week and what a surprise the day we removed it!  The tomatoes and peppers look amazing!  Their color is a deep green and the stems are sturdy and strong–we’ve had to cut off a gazillion premature blooms, but with the vitality of the plants we are not concerned.   And the cold?–on my goodness!  It was just what the cole crops–broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, spinach, and bok choi– needed; even the snap peas look better!  (I call them the ‘cold’ crops because they are the plants that like it cool and mild, and they bolt and run-away when it gets hot!)

Hard to consider that the cold was a good thing–but I actually believe it was.  I doubt we would have covered the tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, and green beans with a row cover, but did so because of the fear of loosing them.  The temperate plants were wrapped in a protective cocoon that helped their roots develope and intensified the small amount of sun present, while the cold was a boost for the other crops which had been dealing with an unseasonably hot spring.   There is a wisdom greater than ours…

Now–if I could talk myself into some positive benefit of the gusts of wind upto 35 mph!!

The Farmer’s Wife–